Mercury simulations unique to OLI

OLI PRESENTS AT ISSP 2018

Mercury simulation in water, alcohols, and hydrocarbons

The OLI MSE model predicts phase equilibria
of mercury, necessary for removal of this toxic pollutant from industrial processing systems
Dr. Peiming Wang will present this work at ISSP on 15 - 20 July 2018

Achievement


Based on OLI's expanded mercury model and existing models for relevant gas components (e.g. CH4, CO2, N2), mercury distribution and dropping-out in gas mixtures have been predicted. The predicted results show interesting trends of mercury partitioning with respect to the changes in temperature and pressure.

Significance and impact

 

Mercury is known to be one of the most toxic pollutants in environment. Its presence in industrial processing systems such as those in natural gas production poses technical challenges by causing corrosion and embrittlement as well as fouling and plugging of equipment due to precipitation as insoluble salts. [1]Knowledge of mercury chemistry and mercury properties including solubility, volatility, and reactivity is critical to understanding and predicting its potential adverse effects on environment and on the industrial processes in which it is present, and to optimizing technologies for the removal of mercury.

The sample plots shown here are the solubility of metallic mercury in gaseous (top) and liquid (bottom) as a function of pressure at high temperatures.

 

Modeling solubility & solution chemistry of mercury
in water, alcohols, and hydrocarbons

Tours, France on 15 - 20 July 2018
Dr. Peiming Wang, Senior Scientist at OLI Systems, will be attending 18th ISSP conference International Symposium on Solubility Phenomena and Related Equilibrium Processes
Peiming will be presenting the paper below  
 
Authors: Peiming Wang, PhD & Andre Anderko, PhD, OLI Systems, Inc.
 

In the present work, we apply a previously developed thermodynamic model, the Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte (MSE) model [2] to calculate the solubility of elemental mercury, Hg0, in water and selected alcohols and hydrocarbons in order to understand how mercury partitions between vapor, water, and oil phases. Solubilities of inorganic mercury compounds (i.e. HgS, HgCO3, and HgO) in aqueous solutions are also calculated. In particular, we have developed universal sets of model parameters for Hg0/alkane, Hg0/aromatic, and Hg0/alcohol mixtures, based on the available experimental solubility data, to reproduce solubilities in the liquid and vapor (for light hydrocarbons) phases of these solvents. Solubilities of mercury have been compared for solvents from the same group (e.g. alkanes with different carbon numbers) and among different groups of solvents (e.g. alkanes, aromatics, alcohols, and water) to show some general regularities that have been reproduced by the model.  The universal parameters developed in this study have been applied to predict mercury solubilities in systems for which experimental data cannot be found. These parameters can also be used for process simulation in petroleum refinery applications for systems with pseudo-components.

 

Based on the new mercury model and existing models for relevant gas components (e.g. CH4, CO2, N2), mercury distribution and dropping-out in gas mixtures have been predicted. The predicted results show interesting trends of mercury partitioning with respect to the changes in temperature and pressure.

References:

[1] Wilhelm, S. M. Mercury in Petroleum and Natural Gas: Estimation of Emissions from Production, Processing, and Combustion. EPA-600/R-01/066, September 2001.

[2] Wang P., Anderko A., Young R. D., Fluid Phase Equilibria 203, (2002) 141-176.

This paper will become available from OLI once it is presented at the Symposium - reserve a copy!

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